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Immersion thermometer

Immersion thermometers make it possible to measure the temperature in liquids and viscoplastic substances. The probe tip is also designed for insertion.

Thermometers with depth: Highly precise, fast and handy

Immersion thermometers from Testo are ideal for applications in laboratories, catering, industry or heating technology. Testo offers special models for measuring the temperature in aggressive media such as acids and bases.

Advantages of Testo immersion thermometers

  • Quick, reliable temperature control for everyday use.

  • Thin, lightning-fast probe tips for clean measurement, e.g. in food processing.

  • High-precision temperature measurement even in aggressive media.

  • Infrared measurement for exceptionally fast temperature scans.

  • Wide variety of models and outstanding value for money.

Our immersion temperature measuring instruments

Soup or acid: the ideal immersion thermometer for any application

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Practical expertise relating to temperature measurement with immersion thermometers

Immersion thermometers from Testo are specifically designed for measuring the temperature in liquids, pastes and semi-solid media such as meat, fish or dough. Here, no distinction is made between immersion thermometers and penetration thermometers, because the probe tip is optimized for media ranging from liquid through to semi-solid. However, depending on the application, different performance characteristics are required in the temperature measurement.

Find out here which immersion thermometer is right for your requirements:

Prevent measurement errors with your thermometer for immersion

One of the most common application errors when it comes to temperature measurement is impatience. Why is that? Because your immersion thermometer requires a sufficient acclimatization time. If the temperature probe and measurement object are at different temperatures, the measurement results are falsified because the actual temperature is not measured. If, for example, the probe is colder than the measurement object, it extracts the heat – and therefore energy too. You can easily prevent this by observing the so-called t99 time and two rules of thumb:

Temperature measurement without immersion thermometer: